7th Annual oSTEM Conference - Schedule


Detailed Schedule

Our schedule got its final updates!

Download a pdf of the below schedule

Thursday - 11/16

Registration/Check-In opens at 12:00 pm

Meet with your hackathon team and get acquainted with the problem you'll be tasked to solve! This is the kickoff event for our Hack 4 Queer Youth hackathon we're parterning with Maven and QTC Chicago for. For more information please visit our hackathon page.

Offsite - Microsoft Office

Friday - 11/17

Registration/Check-In opens at 8:30 am

Keep on coding and building out your solution. The hackathon continues into day 2. For more information please visit our hackathon page.

Offsite - Microsoft Office

For those that have signed up for the site tours of Accenture, Boeing, and AECOM, please meet in the lobby of the hotel.

Hotel Lobby & Various

If this is your first oSTEM conference this is the program for you. We’ll review special programs, what you should expect from workshops, tips for the career fair, and share some more about oSTEM.

London

Join K. Ryder Fox and Traci Davis to gain foundational skills for engaging the LGBTQIA+ STEM community through safe and supportive methods.

London

Up to two leaders from each oSTEM chapter are invited to attend this leadership summit. Learn what it means to be an oSTEM chapter leader and how to develop engaging programming and events. We will walk you through the entire event planning process! More information will be provided via your oSTEM Chapter mailbox closer to the event date.

Charles DeGaulle

Kick off your conference with a student/professional mixer and bootcamp prep session. STEM professionals will be on hand to review CVs and resumes, practice elevator pitches, and speed network. Start to warm up your skills in this interactive session. All conference attendees are encouraged to attend!

London, Heathrow, & Da Vinci

The Opening Reception is a time to connect with oSTEM friends and colleagues, old and new. Please join us for this kickoff networking event!

Grand Ballroom Prefunction
Please join us for our first keynote, Dr. Manu Platt, and dinner of the oSTEM Annual Conference.
Grand DE

Dr. Manu Platt

Dr. Manu Platt received his B.S. in Biology from Morehouse College in 2001 and his Ph.D. from the Georgia Tech and Emory joint program in biomedical engineering in 2006. He finished his postdoctoral training at MIT in orthopedic tissue engineering and systems biology prior to returning to Georgia Tech and Emory in the joint department of Biomedical Engineering in January 2009, where he has since been promoted and tenured. His research centers on proteolytic mechanisms of tissue remodeling during disease progression using both experimental and computational approaches. These diseases of focus are health disparities in the U.S., but global health concerns: pediatric strokes in sickle cell disease, personalized and predictive medicine for breast cancer, and HIV-mediated cardiovascular disease, which has taken him to South Africa and Ethiopia for collaborative work to find solutions for low resource settings. His work has been funded by NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, International AIDS Society, Georgia Cancer Coalition, and the National Science Foundation. He is also the Diversity Director for the NSF Science and Technology Center for Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS).
Awards for mentoring and outreach have included the Georgia Tech Diversity Champion award, Junior Faculty Above and Beyond Award, and the Junior Faculty Outstanding Undergraduate Research Mentor Award from Georgia Tech. He was recently named an Emerging Scholar by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine in 2015, Atlanta 40 under 40 by the Atlanta Business Chronicle in 2016, and the Biomedical Engineering Society Diversity Award in 2017.


Saturday - 11/18

Please join us for breakfast.

Grand Foyer DE

Students and Postdocs from various oSTEM Chapters will display their research posters between these hours. Please visit this page if you are interested in submitting a poster or contact conference-programming@ostem.org if you would like to be a poster judge.

Grand DE Prefunction
Please join us for our opening address to help kick off the second day of the oSTEM Annual Conference.
Grand DE
Quiet Space
Gatwick

This room will be open for those that need a quiet space.


Resume/CV/Interview Prep Room
Da Vinci

This room is for any conference attendees to get critiques on their resume/CV and interview tips and practice from some of our corporate sponsors.


Community Breakout: (Dis)Ability

Moderators: Chad Coarsey & Traci Davis

Heathrow A

A discussion group for participants who identify with the (Dis)Ability community. It is facilitated by members of the oSTEM Diversity Council. This session is a safe space of open and honest intra-community dialogue. This breakout is for discussion to raise concerns and address issues which limit full inclusion in the STEM community. This session is only for members of the community.


Community Breakout: Women in STEM

Moderators: Leah Yoemans and Lilian Martinez

Heathrow B

A discussion group for participants who identify with the Women in STEM community. It is facilitated by members of the oSTEM Diversity Council. This session is a safe space of open and honest intra-community dialogue. This breakout is for discussion to raise concerns and address issues which limit full inclusion in the STEM community. This session is only for members of the community.


Career Deep Dive: Northrop Grumman & Raytheon
Charles DeGaulle

Join this session to hear from these sponsors.


End Police Violence with Artificial Intelligence

Brandon D. Anderson

Florence

Police violence against black, brown, and LGBTQ+ people is happening at an alarming rate. The lack of clear, actionable information plays a major role in enabling police violence across the country. Smartphones have helped bring the issue of police violence to the spotlight. We believe they can be a part of the solution, too. This workshop will discuss the history of state-sanctioned violence against the world’s most vulnerable populations and introduce Raheem AI, a Messenger Bot that lets you anonymously rate your experience with police officers and share it via an online, interactive dashboard open to the public. Raheem AI is a tech startup funded by President Obama’s White House initiative, My Brother’s Keeper.


Navigating Gender Transition in an Uncertain World

Erica Snider, K Ryder Fox, Nathan Aguirre, Victoria Datta

Vienna

As transgender people, we may see our interactions as taking place inside environments of polar extremes: one where inclusivity is the rule and we are most freely ourselves; and one where discrimination seems to rule and we feel unwelcome. In the most inclusive spaces, we are empowered to make personal decisions about transition and timing that best reflect our inner selves. However, how do we respond within settings of deeper discrimination? Do we postpone, or rush transition-related care? And how does that affect our own coming out, transition experience, and mental health? This panel explores these dichotomies, as panelists discuss their experiences with social and medical transition and how environment and timing contributed. Though no single answer will apply directly to another individual’s experiences, it is the goal of this panel to speak candidly to how these concerns shape us. We will then discuss ways to preserve our best interests in the face of uncertainty or environmental pressure.


"Only" but Never Alone: Thriving in STEM with Intersecting Identities

Dr. Deanna Hence

London

A 2014 survey of its members by the American Meteorological Society found that only 2.1% of respondents identified as Black or African-American, a number that has not grown significantly since 2005. Being in such a small percentage, it is easy to get lost in the crowd, to feel like the “only one” in your department, your specialty, or among your peers. If you have many intersecting identities being ‘only’ might feel like your primary identity. Led by a presenter who will talk freely about the intersections of being a Black, cis-female, Texan, bisexual professor, this session will explore how to succeed in STEM while preserving yourself. Sharing personal experiences such as becoming a ballroom dancer as a means for self care throughout graduate school, the presenter will challenge attendees’ own creativity and empower them toward personal success through hosting a lively discussion.


Best Practices for ERGs | Professional Track

Aamir Vaid

Paris

Today the top companies are investing in their employees by launching Employee Resource Groups (ERG) within the company. ERG’s have a considerable positive impact on the business as well as an increase in employee engagement. Genentech is no exception and has over 20 ERG groups for employees to participate in. Genentech’s LGBTQA ERG (gPRIDE) is a successful diverse group that understands the need to focus on LGBTQA engagement locally and within the company all while carrying out the groups mission statement. This workshop will focus on the Best Practices to creating and maintaining a successful ERG a large company. We will cover items that have made gPRIDE at Genentech successful and one of the strongest ERG’s within the company.


Inside Scoop from Professional Recruiters Panel

Moderator: Andrew Wiechkoske | Panelists: Ilenia Hererra Lutz, Christopher Magaha, Tamara Burks

Malpensa

Quiet Space
Gatwick

This room will be open for those that need a quiet space.


Resume/CV/Interview Prep Room
Da Vinci

This room is for any conference attendees to get critiques on their resume/CV and interview tips and practice from some of our corporate sponsors.


Community Breakout: Trans/Non-Binary

Moderator: K Ryder Fox

Heathrow A

A discussion group for participants who identify with the Trans/Non-Binary community. It is facilitated by members of the oSTEM Diversity Council. This session is a safe space of open and honest intra-community dialogue. This breakout is for discussion to raise concerns and address issues which limit full inclusion in the STEM community. This session is only for members of the community.


Community Breakout: Faith

Moderator: Sam Brinton

Heathrow B

A discussion group for participants who identify with the Faith community. It is facilitated by members of the oSTEM Diversity Council. This session is a safe space of open and honest intra-community dialogue. This breakout is for discussion to raise concerns and address issues which limit full inclusion in the STEM community. This session is only for members of the community.


Career Deep Dive: NASA & Genentech
Charles DeGaulle

Join this session to hear from these sponsors.


How to Get Campus Administration AND Drag Queens on Your Side

Mary Balise

Florence

Have you ever found yourself accidentally the President of two student organizations? Now, have you ever tried to find two drag queens in an unknown parking lot somewhere on your campus an hour before the biggest event of the year? You may be surprised to find that the latter is significantly more difficult. Both of these things have happened to Mary Balise of the University of Miami who will teach you how to advocate for LGBTQ+ students and grow your oSTEM chapter, regardless of your campus environment. You will also learn about student leadership for your campus and chapter, working with administration, and how to survive accidentally making an enemy out of a locally famous drag queen.


Bi+ Visibility

Leah Yoemans

Vienna

What does it mean to identify as bisexual? Why are bisexuals often an overlooked segment of the LGBTQA community? This engaging workshop will give you tools for challenging ignorance, biphobia and bi erasure.


STEM with Soul: Choosing Careers that Honor our Values

D Conner

London

While technology has made modern life possible, STEM practice has historical and current problems that may come into conflict with our values. This workshop consists of participant-directed discussion to identify 1) values, 2) areas where those values might conflict with major directions of our industries/funding sources, and 3) ways to use our STEM skills to enhance people’s lives and global sustainability, while still making a living. Some examples of technology-values conflicts include: Many advancements only benefit wealthy people or countries, while people living in poverty struggle to get safe drinking water and reliable electricity. Socioeconomic barriers limit access to STEM education, perpetuating underrepresentation. Plastics are still mostly petrochemical in origin; this waste can end up in oceanic garbage patches or be recycled into useful products. Engineering has extensive military applications, yet the same skills can revolutionize civilian medicine, energy, and infrastructure. Let’s use our powers for awesome!


Courageous Conversation on Diversity & Inclusion | Professional Track

Therese Klein, Steve Stall

Paris

While increasing the number of women in technology is partially about opening up opportunities to do so, it's also about a serious cultural shift. In this session you will discover the secrets to creating culture transformation by example of one company (Rockwell Automation), and the courageous conversations that made it happen. You will learn and practice tools for action, and will partner with others to discuss workplace challenges. Come learn how you can enhance your inclusive leadership skills to create fundamental culture shifts at work.


Dear White People: Intersection of Race/Ethnicity & LGBTQIA Identity Panel

Moderator: Lilian Martinez | Panelists: Jimmy Su, Angie Gonzalez, Hector E. Rodriguez-Simmonds, Michael Bancroft, Christopher Cross

Malpensa

If you have allergies or any dietary restrictions, please indicate those during registration.
Inviting all sponsors and potential future sponsors to join lunch with the oSTEM Sponsorship Committee to discuss this year’s oSTEM goals, the new oSTEM mission, engagement opportunities for this year, and the upcoming opportunities for this year.

Grand DE

If you have allergies or any dietary restrictions, please indicate those during registration. These regional mixers are intended for you to meet local oSTEM members in a casual setting while eating lunch! Please attend the mixer for your region so you can meet and network with other members in your region and meet your Regional Coordinator. This session is open to all student members and all professionals not attending the Sponsor Meeting.

Region A
Florence
Region B
Vienna
Region C
Charles DeGaulle
Region D
London
Region E
Paris
Region F
Malpensa
Connecticut Delaware Alabama Illinois Arizona California
Maine Indiana Arkansas Iowa Colorado Idaho
Massachusetts Kentucky Florida Kansas New Mexico Montana
New Hampshire Maryland Georgia Minnesota Oklahoma Nevada
New Jersey Michigan Louisiana Missouri Texas Oregon
New York Ohio Mississippi Nebraska Utah Washington
Pennsylvania Virginia North Carolina North Dakota Wyoming
Rhode Island Washington D.C. South Carolina South Dakota
Vermont West Virginia Tennessee Wisconsin
Non-US
Da Vinci B is available for attendees interested in joining a professional oSTEM chapter.

Various

Our annual all organization meeting in which we discuss in detail the future of the organization, fill out our annual assessment survey, and have our organizational town hall. We encourage all conference attendees to attend to make sure their voice is heard as we move forward in serving our community.

Grand DE

Check our Sponsors Page for a list of participating companies! Be sure to upload your resume to oSTEM Careers

Headshots will also be taken during this time.

Prefunction
Grand FGH
Corridor

Meet with other graduate students and post docs to have round table discussions about a variety of topics. If you'd like to suggest topics for discussion please email conference-logitics@ostem.org

London
Quiet Space
Gatwick

This room will be open for those that need a quiet space.


Community Breakout: Queer/Pan/Ace/Middle Sexualities

Moderator: Leah Yoemans

Heathrow A

A discussion group for participants who identify with communities outside of the sexuality binary. This includes but is not limited to: bisexual, pansexual, asexual, aromantic, queer, questioning, etc. It is facilitated by members of the oSTEM Diversity Council. This session is a safe space of open and honest intra-community dialogue. This breakout is for discussion to raise concerns and address issues which limit full inclusion in the STEM community. This session is only for members of the community.


Community Breakout: Racial and Ethnic Minorities

Moderator: Lilian Martinez

Heathrow B

A discussion group for participants who identify with the Racial and Ethnic Minorities community. It is facilitated by members of the oSTEM Diversity Council. This session is a safe space of open and honest intra-community dialogue. This breakout is for discussion to raise concerns and address issues which limit full inclusion in the STEM community. This session is only for members of the community.


Career Deep Dive: Rockwell Automation & BASF
Charles DeGaulle

Join this session to hear from these sponsors.


Bring Your Best Self to Work

Dr. Michael Kevin Hernández, Beau Williams, Michael Villanueva

Florence

For many LGBT individuals, there is a conscious effort to separate one’s private life from the workplace. The adverse cost of covering our identities at work does not allow us to work to our full potential nor provide our companies the expertise and skills we exemplify. This class will help participants understand the costs of covering, leveraging the business case for diversity and provide examples of successful LGBT employees from the Boeing Company. Upon completion of the class, participants will understand the value of being out in the workplace and how embracing one’s authenticity can create greater inclusion for all employees.


You Are Enough: Active Bystander Intervention on College Campuses

Courtney Amster, Dana Michels

Vienna

Bystanders are individuals who witness instances of power-based violence and have the opportunity to provide assistance, but fail to intervene. In this session, we invite attendees to be active bystanders, or upstanders. Active Bystanders are able to identify potentially violent situations and take action to alleviate the harm by intervening. Acts of power-based personal violence, such as sexual assault, domestic violence, and stalking, are increasingly prevalent on college campuses and often occur in the presence of bystanders. Attendees will learn the common reasons why people hesitate or fail to intervene upon witnessing situations of power-based personal violence and will be given the tools to develop their own strategies for intervention. Stepping up to intervene can have tremendous impacts on the outcome of potentially violent situations and on how a community responds to sexual violence. Attendees will be invited to identify their role in preventing power-based violence.


It’s Okay to Not Be Okay: Managing Your Mental Health

Stephanie Huard

London

Often mental health goes unnoticed or lacks visibility in STEM programming because of associated stigma. Even more stigma and challenges may arise for people with mental illnesses other than depression and anxiety. When intersecting identities and lacking access compound personal experiences, individuals can find themselves in greater need. This workshop will focus attentions on some of the lesser represented mental health conditions. Attendees will also be exposed to resources that are not often mentioned, such as appropriate social media outlets and apps that target personal health. These ‘at your fingertip’ resources aid accessibility by breaking down cost and urban barriers while being attractive to many traditional-aged college students. Finally, the presenter will devote time to the topic of having more than one intersecting identity, how that influences individual experiences of mental illness, and some specific take-aways for attendees.


Valuing Team Diversity for Fomenting Innovation in Systems Engineering | Professional Track

Jim Leatham

Paris

Companies have recognized that diversity brings forth new perspectives (i.e. innovation) in teams. However, often team members do not recognize their own value, and fear speaking up and going against the flow. In this workshop, we will introduce some tools for brainstorming and innovation. Then we will break into groups and consider a case study of a simple design problem. As we work through the case study, we will identify some of the diverse points of view that we bring to the table because of our perspective- one of non-binary choices, for example, or one that closely mimics what we have observed in nature. We will discuss how our unique perspectives presented as we worked in the group, and how they are formed by our identities; thus bringing an awareness in a concrete way to the value we bring to the team from our diverse background.


Developing Your Trans Narrative

K Ryder Fox

Narita

Your narrative is exactly that--YOURS. Often, marginalized people are open to scrutiny in ways that make it challenging for us as transgender and gender non-binary people to revel in our personal stories. Is such vulnerability even more daunting if you change your name, documents, or physical appearance? Do you lose power when your history comes up as part of your STEM interactions? This session will seek to discuss how shaping our narratives can empower us. From creating value in the parts of us that feel difficult to discuss, to making decisions about how, when, and to whom we share our stories... This workshop will leave attendees room for personal reflection, for strategy, and for practice. Come ready to brainstorm the blueprint of your own narrative in a safe and respectful space.


Queer College Campfire Stories: Sharing Knowledge, Experience, and Resources

Moderator: Angie Gonzalez | Panelists: Mel Abler, Varshini Ramaraj, Niko Thomashow

Da Vinci


Careers in Academic & Industry Research Panel

Moderator: Matthew Welmers | Panelists: Amlan Mukherjee, D Conner, Tami Bowman, James Patrick Horine

Malpensa

Please join us for the reception before the Saturday Keynote and Dinner.

Grand DE Prefunction
Please join us for our dinner in the Grand Mesa Ballroom. We will hear from Clark Hoelscher, view a performance from the Youth Empowerment Performance Project, and present awards during this time. More information on the awards can be found here.
Grand DE

Clark Hoelscher

Dr. M. Clark Hoelscher is a leader for transformational change in education. Inspired by nature’s endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful and passionate about working with young people, they began their career as a biology and physics teacher. They currently lead the Out for Equity Program in Saint Paul Public Schools focusing on systemically improving outcomes for LGBTQ+ students of color. There, they implement the Gender Inclusion Policy and are a member of the District Mental Health and Restorative Practices Committees. Clark aligns culturally responsive education practices in the district in partnership with students, families, staff, and community organizations.
Their efforts as an activist and organizer in bi+ and queer communities began in college. In 2014, they spoke at the White House Bisexual Community Briefing. They became a member of the GLSEN National Advisory Council in 2015. They have a Doctorate of Education in Curriculum and Instruction with a Minor in Education Psychology from the University of Minnesota. Their Bachelor of Science in Ecology, Conservation, and Ecology was completed at the University of Texas.
Clark lives in Minneapolis with their family. They love reading science fiction and seeking adventure outdoors. They identify as a white, bisexual, gender queer person.


Youth Empowerment Performance Project (YEPP)

YEPP seeks a safe environment for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) youth experiencing homelessness to explore their history, investigate new ways to address their struggles and to celebrate their strengths through the process of developing a theatrical performance piece.
YEPP uses harm reduction, social justice, transformative justice and education for liberation (theatre of the oppressed and popular education) frameworks to contain and guide the work. Meanwhile YEPP members participate in the program, we support them with resources around housing, employment, educational, legal and health resources, food, transportation, among other basic needs.
We work with the ensemble members for one year: 6 months in the story telling, individual-group healing, and theatrical performance piece development, and 6 months traveling around the country performing, creating awareness and educating communities about LGBTQ streetbased youth issues. As part of our mission to create awareness and educate communities, we facilitate workshops in which we incorporate theatre of the oppressed and popular education techniques.

Conference attendees are invited to this oSTEM Social where you can relax and hangout with our student conference attendees. oSTEM will be providing Wiis and games to play.

LAX A/B

Sunday - 11/19

Please join us for breakfast.

Grand DE
Quiet Space
Gatwick

This room will be open for those that need a quiet space.


What It's Like to Work at a U.S. National Lab

Elizabeth Merritt, Mark Costella, Travis O'Brien, Christopher J. Bannochie, Jason Michnovicz

Heathrow A

The National Lab Pride (NLP) consortium will feature a panel of LGBTQ scientists, engineers, and technical professionals from the U.S. national laboratory system. They will discuss their career trajectory, being LGBTQ in the workplace, and offer insights on their research and what it's like to work at a U.S. national lab. The panel’s goal is to provide participants an opportunity to learn about the national labs as a possible career path beyond academia or industry. Visit us at bit.ly/nationallabpride.


Destigmatizing Invisible (Dis)Abilities and Illnesses within the LGBTQA+ Community

Moderator: Chad Coarsey

Heathrow B

This panel discussion will focus on Invisible disabilities such as cognitive disorders or mental illnesses that affect LGBTQIA STEM workers in their professional and personal lives. Because silence adds stigma to already marginalized individuals, we will openly discuss topics like mental health, dyslexia, chronic pain, and progressive illnesses. The session will bring awareness to the association of greater stigmatization of LGBTQIA people who experience invisible illnesses and disabilities. Our goal is to have a productive conversation on overcoming adversity and supporting each other in our journeys to live fulfilling lives. We believe that this goal will be accomplished by providing insight and awareness to individuals and their unique experiences of overcoming the challenges associated to having invisible disabilities. The session’s format is a panel of people who represent a spectrum of invisible disabilities, followed by a guided open forum.


Career Deep Dive: Boeing & Regeneron
Charles DeGaulle

Join this session to hear from these sponsors.


The Barriers Created by Colorism in the STEM Fields

Lilian Martinez

Florence

Colorism refers to discrimination based on skin color. Typically it disadvantages dark-skinned people, and privileges those with lighter skin – often among people of the same ethnic or racial group. Can you think of a list of dark-skinned artists or performers currently on our screens during prime-time? This day in age, we can argue that mass media is the most powerful source of information. It bombards our society with standards of good vs bad, desirable vs undesirable – acceptable versus unacceptable. The message is clear – We don't fit this standard, and for decades we have faced societal and cultural erasure. This workshop will include a short presentation on how societal constructs cause erasure and its effects. Afterwards we will progress to an inclusive, facilitated discussion on our personal experiences with colorism, and the steps we have taken to support adequate representation of our communities.


Is Gender and Sexual Fluidity Losing Its Fluidity in a Changing Climate?

K. Ryder Fox, Sam Brinton

Vienna

2017 has seen a number of policy changes that may leave people whose genders and/or sexualities are fluid feeling pressure to express, or even define themselves, as binary. This discussion-based session will focus on how we define fluidity individually, examining intrinsic definitions and self expressions. The workshop will also serve to discuss how our individual fluidities ebb and flow throughout our lifetimes as well as what that means to us and to our personal interactions. Finally, the session will devote time to discussing the ways that external circumstances impact our feelings about fluid identities and expressions and formulate possible responses to those impacts.


OUTReach: Why & How to do Science Communication

Olivia V. Ambrogio

London

Our current political landscape is putting a number of groups at risk, including (though not limited to) the LGBTQA community and scientists. Now more than ever, it's critical for *any* scientist to be explain their work and its value in a clear and compelling way to any audience--and it's especially important to ensure that public representatives of science don't all look the same. This interactive workshop will highlight the value of being a visible, authoritative, and accessible public voice for science and provide tips for doing it well.


Diversity and Inclusion in University Education: Tips, Tools, and Strategies | Professional Track

Caleb Hightower

Paris

This session, geared towards university-level educators (TAs, graduate students, instructors, etc.), will be a discussion of incorporating our queer identities into our teaching methodologies. The two big questions we will address are (1) what does it mean to be a queer educator?; and (2) how do we as educators recognize the diversity of our student audience? These questions will serve as the basis of a discussion, followed by some practical strategies (from personal experience, colleagues, and research) that we can implement directly in our lectures. Lastly will be an open discussion for other teaching strategies the audience would like to share.


What About Those Grad School Applications?

John McMullen

Da Vinci A

Finding a graduate school program that is the correct fit for you is hard work and oftentimes you do not know the best way to go about it! The goal of this panel is to provide attendees with information about how to choose programs, how to prepare your application, what questions to ask if you go for interview weekends, and ways of including your LGBTQIA identity throughout the process. Please be advised: stories of wacky, fun, stressful, and weird personal experiences throughout this process will be shared! Audience questions will be permitted.


An Introduction to Leadership: Motivating People to Believe and Achieve

Will Davis

Da Vinci B

Leadership is complex concept that has been debated, discussed, modeled, and studied for ages now. When properly exercised, leadership is the ability to translate vision into reality by motivating others to believe, commit, and execute a shared vision. To become an effective leader, one must understand the different types of leadership and how to apply each style in real life. This session explores 4 distinct types of leadership: Influence, Servant, Situational, and Traditional.


How Your STEM Background Will Help the CIA Accomplish Its Mission (Simulation) - 2 Hour Program

Recruiters from CIA

Narita A

The work of the CIA and how it is done is often mysterious to those outside the CIA. Learn more by participating in this 2.0 hour simulation working in small groups with peers and a facilitator where you will asses data, evaluate the implications for US interests, develop hypotheses, test and formulate judgments, and present conclusions.


Research Symposium 1
Narita B
Quiet Space
Gatwick

This room will be open for those that need a quiet space.


STEM Equity in the Classroom

Leah Yoemans

Heathrow A

This session will focus on equitable teaching practices in K-12 STEM education that will promote learning on the part of each student. We will participate in a transdisciplinary STEM investigation, practice collaborative groupwork, and examine disparities and inequities in STEM education. LGBTQA individuals in STEM fields are invisible, yet LGBTQA individuals are an important part of the diversity that will drive innovation. That is why we must create inclusive environments, eliminate disparities, and broaden participation in STEM starting in the early years of education.


The Super-Advocate: Politics, Activism, and Michele Obama's Heels

Sam Brinton

Vienna

NOW is the time to be an advocate. But when considering advocacy, we need to know the rules of the game if we are going to win. Some of these rules are simple while others are woefully complex and keep us from even starting to play the game. This session will walk through what it takes to be an advocate in a variety of paths including as STEM students as well as LGBT activists. We will start with advocacy tips and tricks when dealing with congressional members, the President (yes, I've met him) and finally to the press and public. The goal will be for students to leave the session ready to advocate more effectively for what they want changed in whatever area of interest they hold.


Career Deep Dive: CIA
Charles DeGaulle

Join this session to hear from this sponsor.


Data Science and Unicorns! Build your data science toolbox and make it work for you.

Eric Patridge, Andrew Wiechkoske

Florence

What is data science? What can it do for me? What can't it do? This workshop will provide attendees with a basic understanding of data science and data structures, as well as some of the tools commonly used by data scientists. Using the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) as a case study, presenters will focus on the only LGBTQA-related question, including its limitations. The technical topics will include data programming/analysis, databases, and data visualization tools.


How Inclusive is Your Workplace or Learning Environment? | Professional Track

Erica Snider, Lilian Martinez

Heathrow B

We focus a lot of attention upon training allies regarding the creation of inclusive workplaces or learning environments. Such trainings result in improvements including non-discrimination policies, providing healthcare and facilities, and developing employee resource groups or departmental outreach to diverse people. Unfortunately, from the perspective of LGBTQ+ people whose intersecting identities increase marginalization, lack of inclusion might persist as a regular experience even within their respective communities. Attendees to this workshop are invited to brainstorm collaboratively with presenters on the topic of what makes their experiences inclusive, particularly as it pertains to intersecting identities. Through shared experiences, the first outcome will be the initiation of an Out-List accessible to oSTEM members. As oSTEM strives to engage, empower, and promote our underrepresented members, the session’s second objective is to bring allied and underrepresented attendees together to generate protocol for training curricula aimed at designing inclusive workplaces and learning environments.


Culturally Relevant Curriculum's Affect on the Native American Achievement Gap

Michael Bancroft

London

Many minority students are placed in systems of education that take us away from traditional forms of learning and place us in a states of disengagement. The resulting cultural gap means minority children lose passion in their educational pursuits, leading to higher dropout rates, lower graduation rates, lower college success rates, and a growing achievement gap. Students are passed along through the system without attaining the basic concepts of core subjects. This leads to poor standardized testing scores and misinterpretations of a student's skill, intelligence, and ability. This presentation showcases the weaving of Native American culture into STEM education. Attendees will learn how to use master plans to develop culturally relevant curricula, as well as how to design lessons from pre-designed master plans. Finally, the workshop will specifically educate attendees as to the significant outcomes of culturally relevant teaching to minority students and their communities.


Navigating Adverse Climates as LGBTQ+

K. Ryder Fox

Paris

The LGBT Climate in Physics Report showed that more than a quarter of LGBT respondents observed and/or experienced exclusionary behavior. That statistic is closer to 50% for gender nonconforming and transgender respondents. Similarly, a survey of underrepresented students at New Mexico Tech found that more than 50% of write in responses highlight directed discrimination as the reason they consider transferring to another school. We in STEM fields still have work to do in order to foster welcoming work environments. As students or early career professionals, navigating adverse climates presents challenges beyond those generally required to complete a degree or begin a career. This session will discuss data and personal experiences, offer insight into facing these challenges, and facilitate space for creating a support network while on your educational and early career journey.


"The Gay Privilege”: Transforming Personal Hardships in order to Thrive in STEM

Justine Davidson

Da Vinci A

Privilege is defined as, “a special right, advantage, or immunity granted or available only to a particular person or group of people” and often has a negative connotation. As LGBTQIA individuals, we experience unique hardships and obstacles. These experiences arguably enable us to grow, which gives us a greater capacity to accept and understand. As such, we have the potential to turn our own hardships into personal power. What I will refer to as "The Gay Privilege" provides insights into oppression and intolerance, in turn fostering compassion and empathy. Such skills advantage the LGBTQIA community to be better leaders, innovators, and advocates. This discussion is meant to highlight the positive transformation of personal hardships that allow us to excel in STEM.


Bring Your Full Self

Steve Comingdeer

Da Vinci B

What does being authentic mean to you? Whether it means feeling comfortable, or showing others your fabulous self, it’s important to have your authentic self celebrated. Accenture colleagues will share what authentic means to them, tangible ways to build a support system within an organization, and how to return the favor by establishing your role as a trusted advisor to others. Bringing our whole selves to work creates an environment that supports others to follow suit in bravery and confidence.


How Your STEM Background Will Help the CIA Accomplish Its Mission (Simulation) - 2 Hour Program

Recruiters from CIA

Narita A

The work of the CIA and how it is done is often mysterious to those outside the CIA. Learn more by participating in this 2.0 hour simulation working in small groups with peers and a facilitator where you will asses data, evaluate the implications for US interests, develop hypotheses, test and formulate judgments, and present conclusions.


Research Symposium 2
Narita B

Intersection of Faith & LGBTQIA Identity Panel

Moderator: Jonathan Soulsby, Sam Brinton | Panelists: Kshitij (KD) Deshmukh, David Williams, Rev. Sarah Carpenter, Sam Sharp

Malpensa

If you have allergies or any dietary restrictions, please indicate those during registration.

Grand DE
Please join us for our closing keynote. We will hear from a keynote speaker. We will also announce where next year's conference will be hosted.
Grand DE

Nancy McConeghy

Nancy McConeghy is vice president of Information Technology and chief information officer for Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems. A member of the SAS leadership team, McConeghy leads a complex IT environment supporting more than 13,000 employees and multiple Space and Airborne Systems global locations. She is responsible for providing agile solutions that reinforce Raytheon’s One Company information systems and services philosophy in response to changing business and market demands. Most recently, McConeghy was senior director with Raytheon’s Global Business Services where she led the Business Application Services team and was responsible for the strategy and implementation of business applications used to support both enterprise and businessspecific capabilities.
Since joining Raytheon in 2005, McConeghy’s career has spanned corporate and business level assignments that include leadership roles in SAS Information Technology. McConeghy began her career at Kraft Foods and has held positions of increasing responsibility including leading information technology strategies for ConAgra Foods and Deere & Company. McConeghy holds a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Arizona. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Operations Management Information Systems from Northern Illinois University.